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7 Best Lightweight Wheelbarrows for 2021

A little girl pushes a wheelbarrow near a border of plants and shrubs

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Hauling mulch, tools, weeds you’ve pulled or just about anything: You need a wheelbarrow! 

But heavy, clunky models may not do much to make your time in the garden any easier.

If your outdoor space is a modest size or you want to hang your wheelbarrow for off-season storage, a model that weighs less just makes sense.

Today we’re taking a look at our 7 top choices for the best lightweight wheelbarrow, and each model weighs 32 pounds or less.

You’ll also learn some helpful shopping tips that can help you pick out the one that’s right for you. 

Without further ado, let’s get started! 

  • Weight: 26.8 pounds
  • Bucket capacity: 4 cubic feet
  • Weight capacity: 300 pounds
  • Bucket dimensions: 47.2 inches long, 25.3 inches wide and 28.4 inches tall
  • Wheel type: 10-inch rubber pneumatic tires
  • Bucket material: Polyethylene plastic

This Gorilla Carts option gets our vote for the best lightweight wheelbarrow out there. 

If you’ve read our post on our favorite 2-wheeled wheelbarrows, you’ll notice we feature this model there as well. We love it that much, and for good reason. 

You’ll be hard-pressed to find better function in such a lightweight product, and the dual-wheel design eliminates the risk of tipping over. 

The polyethylene plastic bucket delivers strength and durability, but without adding extra weight. Also, you won’t have any worries about your bucket rusting even if you leave your wheelbarrow outside in the rain. 

Thanks to a low center of gravity and stable square shape, this wheelbarrow is easy to push and maneuver. Also, the bucket stands just about 13.5 inches off the ground, and the low height makes the filling/emptying process a little less work.

The bucket has a volume capacity of 4 cubic feet, which is quite a bit of space. Most standard bags of mulch hold about 1.5 cubic feet, so you’d be able to empty about 2 1/2 bags into the bucket. 

Finally, pneumatic tires definitely make rolling over bumpy terrain a lot easier. But the danger with any air-filled tires is the risk of going flat, and that’s the case here as well. 

Pros

Cons

2. Allsop WheelEasy Folding Yard Cart

  • Weight: 22.6 pounds
  • Bucket capacity: 6 cubic feet
  • Weight capacity: 350 pounds
  • Dimensions: 61 inches long, 30 inches wide and 12 inches tall
  • Wheel type: 12-inch rubber pneumatic tire
  • Bucket material: Vinyl-coated nylon

Allsop bills their product as a “collapsible yard cart,” stating that the unique design takes the traditional concept of a wheelbarrow to a new level.

With the fabric bucket, single wheel and barebones steel frame, it’s not hard to see why this model weighs just a little over 20 pounds!

At first glance, it would seem that a fabric bucket might rip or otherwise not be up to the challenge of hauling your normal garden tools, compost or what-have-you. 

But with industrial-grade stitching and reinforced material, this yard cart is surprisingly sturdy. And it can handle a whopping 6 cubic feet of volume.  

Another great aspect of the fabric bucket is that you can lay it flat on the ground, making for incredibly easy loading or off-loading. Also, the fully collapsible design is perfect if your storage space is limited. 

However, while the bucket is well-designed and highly functional, the wheel/tire construction leaves something to be desired.

Hauling something heavy, like rocks, is a lot to ask of a single small axle with no real structural support to back it up. 

Bottom line: The WheelEasy is ideal for lighter loads, like autumn leaves, mulch or transporting your tools. But if you’ve got heavy items to haul, you might want to look for another option. 

We do also have one more potential concern to point out: At 30 inches wide, the handlebars are pretty far apart. This could lead to balance and steering problems for people who have shorter arms or decreased strength. 

However, the padded handgrips are a nice touch. 

Pros

Cons

3. Suncast Lawn Cart

  • Weight: 11 pounds
  • Bucket capacity: 15 gallons
  • Weight capacity: Not stated
  • Dimensions: 20 inches long, 22 inches wide and 35.5 inches tall
  • Wheel type: 7-inch resin plastic wheels
  • Bucket material: Resin plastic

Besides the children’s model we’re looking at a little later on, the Suncast Lawn Cart is the lightest option in the bunch at only 11 pounds. It’s hard to beat that!

At 7 inches, the resin wheels are pretty generously sized. You should be able to roll over moderately bumpy terrain like grass without much trouble, and the light tread pattern adds a little extra gripping power. 

But your wheels may get bogged down on surfaces like sand or loose gravel.

Besides being lightweight, this cart is also very compact. It’s ideal for small jobs, like these:

  • Moving mulch
  • Holding your tools
  • Hauling a bag of potting soil
  • Collecting fallen leaves
  • Transporting small branches/foliage from pruning or trimming tasks
  • Moving transplants to their new home

To empty the bucket, you can either scoop out the contents with a shovel or tip the cart on its side. 

So this little cart can handle plenty of standard-wheelbarrow jobs, and the plastic resin holds up well to sun and rain. 

But you’ll struggle to haul extremely heavy loads, like stones. Not only does the low bucket make off-loading heavy items a challenge, but the rigid resin could also crack. 

Pros

Cons

4. Garden Star Garden Barrow

  • Weight: 20.1 pounds
  • Bucket capacity: 4 cubic feet
  • Weight capacity: 300 pounds
  • Dimensions: 37 inches long, 25.5 inches wide and 27 inches tall
  • Wheel type: 8-inch pneumatic tires
  • Bucket material: Polyethylene plastic

This wheelbarrow from Garden Star has a few design similarities as the Gorilla Carts option we covered in spot #1:

  1. Dual-wheel construction with pneumatic tires
  2. Square bucket
  3. The same volume/weight capacity (4 cubic feet/300 pounds)

So let’s take a look at the key differences between the two:

Weight. The Garden Star weighs about 6.5 pounds less than the Gorilla Carts: 20.1 pounds for the Garden Star, 26.8 pounds for the Gorilla Carts. 

Dimensions. At 37 inches long, the Garden Star is a full 10 inches shorter in length than the Gorilla Carts (47 inches). This could make the Garden Star a little easier to manage if you’re on the short side. Also, if storage space is at a premium, those 10 inches could make a difference. 

Wheel size. The Garden Star has 8-inch pneumatic tires vs the Gorilla Carts 10-inch ones. The Gorilla Carts’ extra 2 inches in diameter might prevent your wheelbarrow from getting hung up if you’ve got excessive ruts or loose rocks around your garden.

Bucket height. The Garden Star’s upper bucket lip stands 16 inches off the ground, or about 2.5 inches higher than the Gorilla Carts at 13.5 inches. 

Cost. At the time of this publishing, the Garden Star cost almost $20 less than the Gorilla Carts. 

Overall, the Garden Star is a great choice for light, everyday jobs around the garden, especially if you’re looking for a lower price point. And the small size is ideal for a shorter person to use. 

However, if you’re taller, you may have to hunch over to push your wheelbarrow, which could lead to back strain. 

Pros

Cons

5. Smart Garden SLC450 Cart

  • Weight: 13.5 pounds
  • Bucket capacity: 4.5 cubic feet
  • Weight capacity: 250 pounds
  • Dimensions: 39 inches long, 23 inches wide and 27 inches tall
  • Wheel type: 10-inch solid polyethylene plastic
  • Bucket material: Polyethylene plastic

Yes, you read that right: This Smart Garden wheelbarrow weighs a mere 13.5 pounds! This is due in large part to all-polyethylene construction for the bucket, handle and wheels. 

And just because it’s feather-light doesn’t mean you miss out on function. With a 250-pound weight capacity, this cart can handle a respectable amount of mulch, soil, stones and the like. 

The solid poly wheels mean you’ll never have to deal with a flat tire, and they have a nice deep tread pattern that helps you get some grip on smooth surfaces. And at 10 inches in diameter, you should be able to roll over rough terrain without too much effort. 

However, with no pneumatic inner tubes to soften the blow, you’ll probably feel every one of those bumps and jolts. Also, there is a chance your wheels could crack over time from use or age. 

One nice feature is that this cart comes fully pre-assembled, so you can just take it out of the box and get to work. And as a final added bonus, this cart is made in the USA. 

One thing to be aware of is the height for storage, especially if you want to hang your wheelbarrow on the garage wall during the off-season. With the wheels situated under the bucket as they are, this model is pretty bulky. So you’ll need to dedicate quite a bit of space.

Pros

Cons

6. Gorilla Carts Poly Garden Dump Cart

  • Weight: 32 pounds
  • Bucket capacity: 4 cubic feet
  • Weight capacity: 600 pounds
  • Dimensions: 38.7 inches long, 20 inches wide and 19.5 inches tall
  • Wheel type: 10-inch pneumatic tires
  • Bucket material: Polyethylene plastic

This one’s a bit of a departure from your standard wheelbarrow, but it’s got some great features that earned it a spot on the list. 

Weighing 32 pounds, this option is the heaviest of the bunch. But keep in mind that the weight gets spread out over 4 wheels instead of 1 or 2. And there’s also no lifting thanks to the pull handle.

The feature that makes this cart most like a wheelbarrow is the hinged bucket. Just like a traditional wheelbarrow, you can dump the load out instead of having to scoop it out. 

The hinge is on the rear axle, so the cart empties backward. A spring-loaded mechanism holds the bucket securely in place during loading and moving. And when you’re ready to empty, just release the mechanism and the bucket easily tips upward. 

The 10-inch pneumatic tires cut down on shock from rolling over bumpy ground. Steering is also a breeze with a pivoting front axle, so you can turn tight corners with ease. 

At 20 inches wide, this is also the narrowest option we’re looking at here (except for the children’s model up next). This could come in very handy if you’ll be using your cart in narrow garden rows. 

One potential drawback is the assembly process. The cart comes completely disassembled, so plan to dedicate some time to getting everything in working order. And an extra set of hands may come in handy if you’ve got limited experience in putting things together. 

Pros

Cons

7. JOYMOR Kids Wheelbarrow

  • Weight: 5.7 pounds
  • Bucket capacity: Not stated
  • Weight capacity: 66 pounds
  • Dimensions: 29 inches long, 13.6 inches wide and 16.5 inches tall
  • Wheel type: Hollow polypropylene plastic
  • Bucket material: Steel

Getting your children out in the garden with you is a good thing! In fact, this article from PBS outlines how spending time gardening can help your child’s cognitive, physical and emotional development. 

This small lightweight wheelbarrow is the perfect way to encourage your child to feel ownership of their outdoor space. The steel frame/bucket and plastic wheel combine to make this wheelbarrow weigh less than 6 pounds, so even young children can use it easily. 

The wide front wheel adds a little extra stability, making it less likely that your new gardener will tip over. And the rubberized handgrips make it easy for your child to get a firm, comfortable grasp. 

The biggest reason we chose this model is the 16.5-inch handle height. Many other options are about 11 to 12 inches tall, which is too short for most kids over the age of about 4 to use comfortably. 

JOYMOR states the recommended ages for this wheelbarrow are 3-12. While it’s probably a stretch to say that a 12-year-old could use this wheelbarrow, it should be fine for kids up to 8 or 9 years old.

NOTE: If you’re looking for a wheelbarrow for a very young child (like 2-3 years old), this one stands 11 inches tall at the handles. 

Pros

Cons

Shopping for the Best Lightweight Wheelbarrow

Deciding which wheelbarrow is the right one you for depends on your garden situation and how you want to use your wheelbarrow. 

Let’s cover a few things to think about while shopping: 

Wheel Type

You can find a lightweight wheelbarrow with two different types of wheels:

  • Pneumatic tires
  • Industrial-grade plastic wheels

Here’a breakdown of each type:

Pneumatic tires have an air-filled inner tube, much like your standard bicycle tire. This construction provides a cushion against bumpy surfaces, making it easier for you to push your wheelbarrow with less jolting on your arms and hands. 

Pneumatic tires also tend to be larger, typically at least 8 inches in diameter. This larger surface area helps prevent your wheelbarrow from getting stuck in ruts or on bumps.

So if you’ve got very challenging terrain to cross (say loose gravel, sand or extreme bumps and ruts in the lawn), pneumatic tires are a good choice. 

However, you always run the risk of puncturing a pneumatic tire, or it may just go flat over time. Also, rubber can grow brittle in extreme heat or cold, so your tires may degrade after a while.

Industrial-grade plastic wheels are typically made of polypropylene, an incredibly strong composite material based on polymer plastic. These wheels can be either hollow or solid.

Even though pneumatic tires don’t add a lot of extra weight to your wheelbarrow, plastic wheels tend to be even more lightweight. You’ll usually find them on less-expensive wheelbarrows, as well. 

One great thing about plastic wheels is that they aren’t very vulnerable to water, sun or temperature. Also, you’ll never have the worry of finding a flat tire when you’re ready to get to work. 

But most plastic wheels tend to be on the small side, and they definitely function best on smooth, flat surfaces like concrete. You can still roll over level grassy surfaces without too much trouble, but you may struggle with a very bumpy lawn or sandy surfaces. 

And although the plastic is strong, it could still crack under the weight of a very heavy load or with excessive use over time. 

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One Wheel vs Two

Lightweight wheelbarrows come in both single-wheel and dual-wheel designs. Just like we did for the wheel types, let’s look at each option individually.

One-wheel models are your traditional wheelbarrows, and you can’t beat the maneuverability of having just one point of contact with the ground. Single-wheel wheelbarrows also tend to be easier to push uphill.  

If you’ve got some tight corners to navigate or hilly terrain, a one-wheel model might be a great choice. 

However, with that single point of ground contact comes less stability, and it can be hard to maintain balance if you’re hauling a heavy load. 

This can be especially troublesome for you’ve got decreased arm or core strength to work with. 

Two-wheeled wheelbarrows bring extra stability along with their extra wheel. This design eliminates the risk of tipping over, and it also doesn’t require you to spend strength on balancing. 

Also, if you’d rather pull your wheelbarrow behind you, many two-wheeled models make it pretty easy. 

One drawback to two wheels is that you’ll need more space to make turns, and a dual-wheel model may not work for a garden of tightly-packed raised beds. 

And if you’ve got hills to climb, you’ll have to work a little harder to push your two-wheeled wheelbarrow up. One upside to hills, though: It will probably be easier to keep steady control of a two-wheeled model going down. 

Overall Width

You’re not going to see an extreme variation when it comes to wheelbarrow width, but it’s worth considering for these reasons:

  • Narrow spaces between raised beds
  • A garden gate to pass through
  • Tight storage spaces
  • Your physical capabilities

Take the time to measure the areas your wheelbarrow needs to fit through. Remember, you’re better safe than sorry, so don’t guess!

Also, if you’re looking at a model with two separate handlebars, consider the distance between them. The more space between handlebars, the harder it can be to maintain control of your wheelbarrow.

If you have a small frame or you’re dealing with decreased strength, wide-set handlebars may not be a good idea. Instead, a model with one single handlebar may be a better choice. 

Final Thoughts

Just because a wheelbarrow doesn’t weigh much doesn’t mean that it’s short on function. With these 7 options to choose from, we hope you’ve found the lightweight wheelbarrow that’s a perfect fit for your needs!  

If you found this article helpful, please share it on social media! 

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Erinn in front of a garden

About Erinn Witz

Hi! I’m Erinn, a Midwestern gal who’s just as interested in honing my gardening skills as you are. I’m here to show you that if I can do this growing thing, seriously, YOU can too! 

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