23 Stunning North Facing Window Plants

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North facing window plants that thrive in dimmer light.

We’re all conditioned to think that we have to have a south or east facing window if we want to have gorgeous houseplants. But that’s not true!

Many indoor plants do well and even thrive in the softer light of a north facing window. Most tropical houseplants naturally grow in shaded conditions under the dense rainforest canopy, with a few examples being pothos, aglaonema and certain philodendrons. Other plants are highly tolerant of almost any type of light exposure, including snake plant, spider plant and cast iron plant. And still others prefer to grow in lower light, like ZZ plant and peace lily.

So can you grow plants in a north facing window? Yes! In fact, your problem may be narrowing down all your options.

To help you out, we made a list of 23 of our favorite north facing window plants. Even if you don’t have a green thumb, many of these plants are easy to care for and are sure to brighten your home with their beautiful foliage and vibrant colors.

Let’s get started!

RELATED: Do you work in an office with no natural light but still long for some greenery? No worries- visit our post on plants for windowless offices to see 19 awesome options!

1. Aglaonema

A Siam Red Aurora aglaonema.

Many popular variegated houseplants, like Pink Princess Philodendron and Variegated Monstera, need very bright light to keep their color vibrant. Not so with Aglaonema! This plant is a great way to bring a splash of beautiful silver, red or pink color even in the dimmer light of a north window.

Aglaonema actually refers to a large family of plants that includes 12 or 24 varieties, depending on which registry you look at. You’ll find aglaonemas with either silvery or red/pink variegation, both of which are beautiful in their own ways.

The silvery varieties will tolerate lower light, but those with red/pink variegation are the ones that really shine with a northern light exposure. The one in the photo above is a Siam Red Aurora variety.

How to Care for Aglaonema:

  • Give water when the top 1 to 2 inches of soil feels dry to your touch (insert your finger into the soil to test this).
  • Repot every 2 years.
  • Fertilize with a balanced houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/2 strength every 6 weeks during the spring and summer months (April-September). This organic liquid formula from The Grow Co. is a great choice, for aglaonema and any plant on this list.
  • Toxic to humans and pets, and the sap can also be a skin irritant.

Where to Buy Aglaonema:

2. Pothos (Epipremnum Aureum)

A golden pothos plant sits on a desk.

Pothos is an evergreen tropical plant that grows happily in almost any indoor setting. In nature, pothos plants grow in rainforests, attaching themselves to tree trunks with specialized roots as they climb their way to the sun.

In your home, make the most of this amazing growth by letting the vines spill over a table edge or tack them up across a wall. If you’d prefer a bushier look, cut off stems below a leaf node (where a leaf grows out from the stem) to stimulate new growth at the base.

There are many pothos varieties to choose from, with some having all-green leaves and others featuring variegation. The all-green or mostly-green varieties will do best in the dimmer northern light. These include golden pothos (pictured above), jade pothos and neon pothos.

How to Care for Pothos:

  • Water once the top 2-3 inches of soil are dry. But pothos is very forgiving of under-watering, and they won’t mind too much if the entire pot dries out on occasion.
  • Repot annually in the spring.

RELATED: Visit our post on how to repot a pothos to see step-by-step photos of the process!

  • Fertilize sparingly with a houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/2 strength, only 2 to 3 times during the spring and summer months.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Pothos:

3. Dieffenbachia

A Dieffenbachia plant on a bright windowsill.

These plants are hardy and super-easy to care for, making them a great choice if you’re a beginner at caring for plants.

Dieffenbachia is highly tolerant of drought, so they’ll be just fine if you forget to water occasionally. And they’ll also happily grow in almost any lighting, although your plant will stay smaller in the dimmer light of a north window.

Besides their easy care, dieffenbachia’s striking variegation adds instant character and visual interest to any room. Most of the time, highly-variegated plants need at least a moderate amount of sunlight to keep their color vibrant, but not here. Even in a dim corner, a dieffenbachia won’t lose an ounce of its happy personality.

This plant also goes by the common name “dumbcane.” This name comes from the fact that if you were to eat a bite of the plant, your mouth would swell and render you unable to speak for a couple of days. So don’t do that!

How to Care for Dieffenbachia:

  • Water when the top 2 inches of soil have dried out.
  • Plan to repot every 2 to 3 years in the spring.
  • Fertilizing is not required, but you can give a dose of standard houseplant fertilizer once or twice during the spring and summer months.
  • Toxic to humans and animals

Where to Buy Dieffenbachia:

4. Cast Iron Plant (Aspidistra Elatior)

A Cast Iron Plant with green leaves speckled with yellow variegation.

Cast iron plants are sturdy houseplants that can tolerate a variety of conditions, which is exactly how they got their name! While this plant can thrive in bright or medium lighting, it does just as well in the softer sunlight of a north window.

Their easy-going nature and lovely deep green coloring are a perfect way to add some life to your home without committing to a fussy care routine.

Even though it’s a hardy plant, cast iron plant is not a fast grower. Even after several years, it will stay at a fairly compact size that’s perfect for a tabletop or a shelf.

How to Care for a Cast Iron Plant:

  • Water infrequently, when the soil feels dry throughout the entire pot.
  • Cast iron plant only needs repotting every 2 years at most, and you can often stretch that timeframe out to every 4 years.
  • Fertilize with a standard houseplant fertilizer monthly during the spring and summer months.
  • Non-toxic to humans and pets

Where to Buy Cast Iron Plant:

5. ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas Zamiifolia)

A ZZ plant grows beside a bright window.

ZZ plant has deep-green foliage with a lovely glossy finish. The leaves are wonderfully efficient at processing whatever sunlight comes their way, so this is a great houseplant for low-light areas.

The ZZ plant is native to East Africa, where it grows in dry grasslands or forests. It’s highly tolerant of drought, and it stores extra water in its bulbous roots, known as rhizomes.

Thanks to this characteristic, ZZ plant prefers its soil on the drier side, which is great for us plant parents who may forget to water every once in a while.

How to Care for ZZ Plant:

  • Water infrequently, when the soil has completely dried out.
  • Repot your ZZ plant about every 2 years, using a larger pot that gives the rhizome plenty of space to grow.
  • Fertilize monthly during the spring and summer months, using a regular houseplant fertilizer.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy ZZ Plant:

6. Scindapsus Pictus

A Scindapsus pictus Argyraeus.

This lovely little plant comes in several different varieties, including Argyraeus (pictured above), Silvery Ann and Jade. Jade is an all-green variety, but the others have delicate silver variegation patterns. It’s a true beauty!

Scindapsus pictus is native to naturally-shaded areas in the rainforest understory, so gentle north light is ideal.

Scindapsus pictus also goes by the name “Satin Pothos,” and it does resemble pothos in its vining growth pattern. However, Scindapsus pictus is a completely different genus than pothos. This plant grows much more slowly, and the care needs are a bit different.

But one thing they have in common- both are awesome north window plants!

How to Care for Scindapsus Pictus:

  • Give water when the top 2 inches of soil feel dry, being careful not to let the soil dry out completely.
  • Repot annually in the spring.
  • Apply a regular houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/2 strength every month during the spring and summer.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

RELATED: Visit our full Scindapsus pictus care guide for more information about this delightful plant!

Where to Buy Scindapsus Pictus:

7. Monstera Deliciosa

A Monstera Deliciosa plant grows near a bright window.

It’s an iconic and eye-catching look for sure, and Monstera deliciosa has been a houseplant staple since it first gained popularity in the 1970s. If you’ve seen a tropical print on clothing, decor items or almost anything else, you’ve seen a Monstera deliciosa leaf!

As a young plant, Monstera deliciosa has solid, heart-shaped leaves. But as it matures, it develops openings in the leaves, starting at the central vein and moving outwards. Eventually, these holes reach the leaf edges and become deep lobes, known as fenestrations.

In the ideal conditions and given enough time, this plant can reach a massive size- several feet tall with 18 inch-wide leaves. But when you have your Monstera in a north facing window, the light is much more gentle and your plant will probably stay quite a bit smaller.

How to Care for Monstera Deliciosa:

  • Water when the soil has dried out in the pot; it should feel dry as far down as you can reach with your finger.
  • When your Monstera deliciosa is young, you’ll need to repot it annually in the spring. As it matures, growth slows down, so you’ll only need to repot every 2-4 years.
  • Fertilize your plant with a standard houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/4 strength monthly during the spring and summer months.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Monstera Deliciosa:

8. Lucky Bamboo (Dracaena Sanderiana)

A Lucky Bamboo plant in a white pot against a blue background.

You never need to worry that your lucky bamboo isn’t getting enough sunlight from a north window- this plant can tolerate conditions that have almost no natural light and grow like a champ!

Lucky bamboo has its origins in Africa, but it’s most well known in Asian cultures where it’s believed to symbolize luck and wealth. These plants are often sold in groupings and sometimes as a single stalk, and the number of stalks carries different meanings.

Lucky bamboo can grow in either water or moist soil. If you choose the water route, you can fill a clear vase with pretty pebbles and situate your plant in them for a modern, natural look.

How to Care for Lucky Bamboo:

  • If you’re growing in water, change the water out every 2 to 3 weeks. Filtered water is best, but tap water works too if you leave it sit out overnight to allow excess chlorine to evaporate.
  • If you’re growing in soil, keep the soil moist but not waterlogged. Give water when the surface of the soil feels dry to the touch.
  • Move your lucky bamboo into a bigger pot or vase annually.
  • Fertilize your lucky bamboo every 2-3 months with a houseplant fertilizer diluted all the way down to 1/10 strength.
  • Non-toxic to humans, but toxic to pets.

Where to Buy Lucky Bamboo:

9. Spider Plant (Chlorophytum Comosum)

A spider plant grows beside a bright window.

Did your grandma have one of these plants? If she did, she wasn’t alone- spider plant has been a popular houseplant for decades. And with their cheery green-and-white color pattern, fast growth and the ability to grow in almost any lighting, it’s easy to see why they’re beloved by so many.

These plants get their name from the new growth they form that looks almost exactly like spiders dangling from a thread. And when you clip these “spiders” off your plant, you can settle them directly into a pot of soil and get a whole new spider plant.

And having a bunch of spider plants around is a great thing. They’re incredibly resilient and tolerant of most lighting, watering and care routines that you can give them. What’s more, they’re also adept at filtering indoor air.

How to Care for Spider Plant:

  • Water when the top 1 inch of soil feels dry.
  • Repot your spider plant every 1 to 2 years, depending on how fast it grows in your home. Signs that repotting is in order are when root tips start poking through the pot’s drainage holes or the soil starts to dry out much faster.
  • Give your spider plant a dose of standard houseplant fertilizer about once a month during the spring and summer. Be careful not to give too much fertilizer- this could cause brown, crispy leaf tips.
  • Non-toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Spider Plant:

10. Snake Plant (Dracaena Trifasciata)

A small snake plant grows on a windowsill.

This plant goes by a few colorful names, including viper’s bowstring hemp and mother-in-law’s tongue.

But despite its intimidating names, snake plant is a delightfully unique and easy-to-care-for plant that’s perfectly happy in the light of a north window. (In fact, it’s happy almost anywhere.)

There are 70 different species within the Dracena trifasciata genus. Some types stay small and compact, perfect for a table-top display, while others grow larger and will require a spot on the floor. As for coloring, some snake plant species are all-green, others have a subtle striped pattern and still others have some yellow or white variegation.

Snake plants have upright, rigid leaves with semi-succulent qualities, meaning that the plant can store some extra water in its leaves. This characteristic comes in handy in snake plant’s native habitats in dry, arid regions of the world.

And it’s also nice for us houseplant lovers who might forget to water on occasion!

How to Care for Snake Plant:

  • Water only when the soil has dried out throughout the entire pot. Overwatering is the much greater mistake here than under-watering.

RELATED: For more information, see our post on proper snake watering.

  • Snake plants grow best in tight quarters, so you’ll only have to repot every 2 years at the most. In many cases, snake plants don’t need repotting for as long as 5 years.
  • These plants are not heavy feeders, meaning that they don’t need a lot of soil nutrients added. So fertilize your snake only once or twice during the spring and summer months, and if you forget, your plant will probably still be just fine.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Snake Plant:

11. Peperomia Obtusfolia

A Peperomia Obtusfolia grows on a bright windowsill.

Even though many species of peperomia (of which there are 1,500!!) are wonderful indoor plants, not all of them can tolerate the lower light that a north-facing window provides.

But one that can is Peperomia obtusfolia. This plant is also called “baby rubber plant,” and its fleshy, shiny leaves do bear a resemblance to the actual rubber plant (which is also on this list, in spot #20).

You’ll find these plants with either all-green leaves or with some yellow variegation mixed in. This plant stays petite, reaching a maximum height of just 10 inches. Perfect for a windowsill or tabletop!

Peperomia obtusfolia uses their thick leaves to store a bit of excess water, similar to the way a succulent would but to a lesser extent. So you won’t need to keep an eye on the soil moisture quite so much as plants that prefer moist soil.

How to Care for Peperomia Obtusfolia:

  • Water when the soil feels nearly dry throughout the pot.
  • This plant is a fairly slow grower, so you’ll only need to repot it every 2 to 3 years.
  • Fertilize with a standard houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/2 strength every 4 to 6 weeks during the spring and summer months.
  • Non-toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Peperomia Obtusfolia:

12. Weeping Fig Tree (Ficus Benjamina)

A Weeping Fig Tree in a white pot against an off-white background.

Weeping fig trees produce an abundance of small, glossy leaves. Some varieties have creamy white variegation, but the most common color you’ll see is solid green.

These plants start out small and reach a maximum height between 3 and 6 feet. However, in north light, your weeping fig will probably stay closer to the 3-foot range.

If you’d like to keep your weeping fig smaller, you could also apply bonsai techniques, creating a beautiful and intricate look with trunk braiding and strategic pruning.

RELATED: Check out our post on bonsai for weeping fig tree to see some examples!

One thing to be aware of: These plants do not appreciate a change of scenery, and they’ll drop a significant portion of their leaves in protest if you move them from a spot where they’re happy. So once you’ve got your plant settled, it’s a good idea to leave it there unless you want to clean up a big mess!

How to Care for Weeping Fig Tree:

  • Water when the top 2 to 3 inches of soil feel dry to the touch.
  • Hold off on repotting as long as possible to avoid stressing your plant. Signs that you can’t put off repotting any longer are roots poking out through the pot’s drainage holes and the soil drying out more rapidly. Younger plants may need repotting annually, but more mature plants can usually go 2 to 3 years in their current pot.
  • Fertilize weeping fig tree with a standard houseplant fertilizer every 2 weeks during the spring and summer.
  • Mildly toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Weeping Fig Tree:

13. Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea Elegans)

A Parlor Palm grows in a bright room against a white background.

Palms are the perfect way to bring a relaxed, island feel into your home, and they come in many varieties with unique appearances.

As natives of the sunny tropics, some palms need more direct light than a north-facing window can provide. But parlor palm is the perfect happy medium!

These delightful plants produce abundant leafy fronds that we all know and love about palm trees. But the nice thing about parlor palm is their naturally compact size. Instead of growing to several feet tall, this one reaches a max height of about 2-4 feet. And it will probably stay even smaller than that in the gentle lighting of a north window.

How to Care for Parlor Palm:

  • Water when the top 2-3 inches of soil feel dry to the touch.
  • Parlor palms grow slowly, so they only need repotting every 2-3 years.
  • Fertilize with a standard houseplant fertilizer every 4-6 weeks during the spring and summer months.
  • Non-toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Parlor Palm:

14. Arrowhead Plant (Syngonium podophyllum)

A "White Butterfly" arrowhead plant.

There are a few different varieties that fall under the category of “arrowhead plant,” and the one we’re featuring here is the white butterfly. The plant gets its name from its triangular shape that resembles a pointed arrow tip.

In the wild, arrowhead plant grows in the tropical rainforests of Central and South America. It is a climbing vine, sending out aerial roots that attach to tree trunks as the plant grows upward toward the sun.

As an indoor plant, you can enjoy this natural vining growth habit by giving your plant a moss pole for support.

How to Care for Arrowhead Plant:

  • Give water when the top 1 inch of soil feels dry.
  • Plant to repot your arrowhead plant about every 2 years, in the springtime.
  • Give a standard houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/2 strength every 2-4 weeks during the spring and summer.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Arrowhead Plant:

15. Heartleaf Philodendron (Philodendron Hederaceum)

A Philodendron Brasil houseplant in striped pot in a bright room.

There are over 450 different species within the Philodendron genus, and the lovely and easy-care heartleaf philodendron is a perfect choice for your north window.

Thanks to its deep-green foliage, vining habit and the fact that it’s almost impossible to kill, heartleaf philodendron has been a popular houseplant for many years.

And recently, plant breeders have introduced a variegated version that we didn’t even know we needed. It’s called Philodendron Brasil, and it offers bright, cheerful lemon-lime coloring (see image above).

Even though many variegated philodendrons do better in the stronger light of an east or south window, Philodendron Brasil is more tolerant of softer light. So it’s a great way to introduce some color to your north window area!

How to Care for Heartleaf Philodendron:

  • Water infrequently, when the top 2-3 inches of soil feel dry to the touch.
  • Repot your heartleaf philodendron when you see signs of being pot-bound: roots peeking out through the pot’s drainage holes, soil drying out quickly. This is usually about every 2-3 years.
  • Give a 1/2 strength dose of standard fertilizer every 2 months during the spring and summer.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Heartleaf Philodendron:

16. Philodendron Micans

A Philodendron Micans houseplant.

This is one of my personal favorites! What I really love about this plant is the amazing leaf surface texture, the beautiful green/gold/red tonal colors and the lovely trailing vines. Each leaf has an intriguing velvety texture that catches the light beautifully:

A Philodendron Micans dark green leaf has a sheen in the sunlight.

When the leaves are just unfurling, they have a lovely bright-green color that mutes over time into a deep green top and a red underside with gold highlights.

Micans is a vining philodendron, and it forms delicate stems that look amazing draping over a table edge or from a hanging basket. Plus, it tolerates low to medium indirect light, so it’s one of the very best plants for north facing windows.

This plant is a true stunner, and the beauty is in the details. You’ve got to have one to truly appreciate its understated charms!

How to Care For Philodendron Micans:

  • Water when the top 1 inch of soil feels dry.
  • Repot your Philodendron Micans every 1-2 years in the spring, when you see signs of your plant becoming pot-bound. Look for roots poking through the pot’s drainage holes and the soil drying out quickly.
  • Fertilize with a standard houseplant fertilizer monthly during the spring and summer, and every 2 months in fall and winter.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

RELATED: For the full details about the background and care needs for this lovely plant, stop by our comprehensive Philodendron Micans post!

Where to Buy Philodendron Micans:

17. Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)

A Peace Lily growing in front of a brick wall background.

Peace lily is a much-beloved houseplant. Besides the draw of its delicate white flowers, this plant is also attractive because it’s so forgiving and thrives in low lighting. Since it prefers dimmer light naturally, peace lily is among the best plants for north facing windows that you’ll find.

Peace lily produces its flowers throughout the spring and summer months, and if you have your plant in a spot that it really likes, you may be able to extend the blooming season through fall.

Each flower starts out green and then turns white as it matures, and it will retain that lovely white color for about 10-14 days. Which is pretty long for a flower to last!

RELATED: Sometimes a peace lily’s flower will turn brown sooner than you expect. To learn the possible reasons behind this and what to do about it, visit our post on peace lily flowers turning brown.

How to Care for Peace Lily:

  • Peace lily prefers soil that’s consistently moist but not water-logged. Water when the surface of the soil feels dry to your touch.
  • Repot every year in the spring.
  • Peace lilies don’t need fertilizer to live, and over-fertilizing can damage your plant. But light fertilizing can help your plant produce its best blooms, so give a standard houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/4 strength every 8 weeks during the blooming season.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Peace Lily:

18. Bird’s Nest Fern (Asplenium Nidus)

A Bird's Nest Fern against a white background.

When you’re looking for an interesting plant that creates a mass of greenery even in a shaded space, ferns deliver in a big way.

As a group, ferns have been around for a long time- it’s believed that ferns were flourishing during the time of the dinosaurs! And they do definitely have a pre-historic look about them.

The bird’s nest fern is unique among ferns in that its fronds are solid instead of heavily fringed. But the fronds often have a kind of crinkly texture, so you still get a hearty dose of visual interest. Add to that the lovely bright-green coloring, and you’ve got a houseplant that brings history and life to your north window.

How to Care for Bird’s Nest Fern:

  • Water when the top 3-4 inches of soil feel dry to the touch.
  • Repot every 1-2 years, when you see roots peeking through the pot’s drainage holes or the soil surface.
  • Fertilize with a standard houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/2 strength every 6 weeks during the spring and summer months.
  • Non-toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Bird’s Nest Fern:

19. Begonia Rex

A Begonia Rex plant with maroon and silver highlights.

Some begonia species are grown for their beautiful flowers, but many others are prized for their foliage, and begonia rex is a perfect example. This stunner will happily grow and produce its colorful leaves in the light of a north window.

This plant comes in several different varieties, all with lovely coloring, scalloped edges and an almost crinkly leaf texture. Some of the colors are creamy white, magenta and lime green, and a few have gorgeous silver highlights.

It’s so artistic that begonia rex also goes by the name “painted-leaf begonia.” If you’re looking for color at your north window, this one’s a winner.

How to Care for Begonia Rex:

  • Water when the top 1 inch of soil is dry to the touch.
  • Repot when the rhizome reaches the sides of the pot. This will typically be every 1-2 years.
  • Fertilize with a standard houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/2 strength every 2 weeks during the spring and summer.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Begonia Rex:

20. Rubber Plant (Ficus Elastica)

A Rubber Plant with pink and cream variegation on the leaves.

In the wild, Ficus elastica trees can reach over 100 feet in height, and their rubbery sap used to function as a primitive rubber.

As a houseplant, your rubber plant will stay much smaller! Most rubber plants are at least 12 inches tall, and in the right conditions, they can grow as tall as 8 feet. So if you’ve got room around your north window, let your rubber plant grow at its own pace.

But if you’d like to keep your rubber plant on the smaller side, selectively pruning new growth and keeping your plant in a smaller pot can help. And of course, the dimmer light from a north window will also slow the growth rate down.

How to Care for Rubber Plant:

  • Water when the top 1 inch of soil is dry to the touch.
  • Repot your rubber plant when it shows signs of being pot-bound: roots sticking out through the pot’s drainage holes or the soil surface, or the soil drying out quickly. Typically, you should plan to repot every 2-3 years.
  • Fertilize with a standard houseplant fertilizer every month during the spring and summer.
  • Toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Rubber Plant:

21. Chinese Money Plant (Pilea Peperomioides)

A Chinese Money Plant in a gray pot.

Chinese money plant gets its name from the fact that its round, fleshy leaves look very much like coins. It’s also said to symbolize wealth and prosperity, and some believe that having the plant in your home will also cause you to come into extra money. (As far as I know, there’s no guarantee on that though!)

Even if it doesn’t bring you unexpected wealth, the Chinese money plant certainly does bring a cheery look and easy care. The vibrant green leaves are great at absorbing whatever sunlight comes their way, and this plant is happy to live in your north-facing space.

The leaves have succulent qualities, meaning that they’ll store excess water for use later on. And that’s nice for houseplant parents who may forget to water from time to time.

How to Care for Chinese Money Plant:

  • Water when the top 3-4 inches of soil feels dry.
  • Plant to repot your Chinese Money Plant every 1-2 years.
  • Fertilize with a standard houseplant fertilizer every month during the spring and summer.
  • Non-toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Chinese Money Plant:

22. Bromeliad

A Bromeliad with a beautiful pink blossom.

Most of the time, flowering plants need quite a bit of direct sunlight to produce all the energy they need for their colorful blossoms. But if you long for a gorgeous pop of color at your north window, consider getting a bromeliad.

In fact, gentle northern light is perfect for these tropical beauties to flourish. In dimmer light away from a window, the plant would struggle to produce a bloom. But in light that’s too strong, the foliage can shift from a healthy green into a sickly yellowish hue.

Bromeliads come in stunning shades:

  • Red
  • Orange
  • Pink
  • Purple
  • Yellow
  • White

While each plant produces just a single blossom in its lifespan, that bloom will last up to 6 months.

However, your plant will still have its unique green leaves for you to enjoy. And with some dedicated effort on your part, your plant can produce new baby bromeliad plants that will bloom in their own lifetime.

How to Care for Bromeliad:

  • Water your bromeliad when the top 2-3 inches of soil feel dry to the touch. To give water, pour water into the center of the plant, which is called a cup or tank. Keep pouring water into the cup until it flows out onto the soil.
  • Bromeliads prefer to be in tight quarters, and most will never need a pot larger than 6 inches in diameter. If your bromeliad is already in a pot that size, you can just leave it there. Young bromeliads in pots about 3-4 inches in diameter will need to be moved up to a larger pot when the roots start becoming crowded.
  • Fertilize with a standard houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/2 strength every 3 months during the spring and summer.
  • Non-toxic to humans and pets.

This video by Healthy Houseplants does a great job of giving you more detailed bromeliad background and care tips:

Where to Buy Bromeliad:

23. Calathea

A Calathea houseplant on a wooden plant stand.

There are about 60 species within the calathea family. They are all tolerant of low light, so any variety you choose should thrive in your north window.

Many types of calathea have beautiful variegation patterns, with some featuring pink pinstripes, creamy white patches of color or a lively yellow-green combo.

Besides their lovely colors and patterns, calathea also have a special trick- they fold their leaves shut each evening. The leaves are light-sensitive, and joints within the central leaf vein shut when the light gets dim, folding the leaves up until the morning light hits them again.

How to Care for Calathea:

  • Give water when the top 2-3 inches of soil feel dry to the touch.
  • Plan to repot your calathea about every 2 years in the spring.
  • Fertilize your calathea with a standard houseplant fertilizer every month during the spring and summer.
  • Non-toxic to humans and pets.

Where to Buy Calathea:

An infographic showing the best north facing window plants.

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Frequently Asked Questions about North Facing Window Plants

Legginess (long, lanky stems with excessive space between leaves) and leaf discoloration are the two most common signs that your plant needs more light.

A plant gets leggy when it stretches its stems out in search of light. Besides being unsightly, a leggy plant is weak and unable to hold itself upright.

Leaf discoloration usually shows up as a pale green or a yellowish hue. This occurs because the plant’s chlorophyll (which provides the green color) is not able to do its job in the absence of light.

Yes, there are many plants that thrive in the light of a northern window. Most of the plants that do well in less light are foliage plants, or those that are grown for their attractive leaves.

Situate your plants as close to your north window, so they can soak up as much light as possible. If you’re concerned that your plant may not be getting enough light, a grow light can help provide some additional UV rays.

Highly-variegated plants, succulents and most flowering plants all require more sunlight than a north facing window can provide. These do better in a south or east-facing window.

Final Thoughts

I hope this list of awesome north facing window plants has given you some inspiration. Houseplants truly are a joy, and with a little research and careful selection, you can enjoy them no matter which way your natural light comes into the room!

Have you had any of these plants before? Do you have any care tips to share, or do you have any other plants to suggest for north windows? We’d love to learn together, so please share your thoughts in the comments!

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